Community Benefit Efforts

For more than 55 years, Texas Children’s Hospital has been providing health and hope to children and their families.

Texas Children’s Community Benefit program comprises strategically focused initiatives and services designed to meet the needs of our growing, diverse community.


What is a Community Benefit?

In addition to taking care of families who seek care at our facilities, as a non-profit hospital that receives tax-exemptions, Texas Children’s provides leadership and support for activities that improve the health of the communities we serve. These “community benefits” respond to demonstrated health-related needs and seek to achieve the following objectives:

  • Improve Access to Health Services
  • Enhance Public Health
  • Advance Generalized Knowledge
  • Relieve a Government Burden

Our Community, Our Home

Understanding the demographics of the communities we serve is important to planning a thoughtful Community Benefit program with lasting impact.

Consider the following facts:

  • Houston is the fourth largest city in the United States, with the larger metropolitan area being home to more than 6.1 million residents.
  • Houston encompasses the third-youngest population and one of the fastest growing pediatric populations in the nation.
  • 1 in 3 children in the nation is covered by Medicaid and 1.4 million children in Texas remain uninsured.

While these statistics underscore Houston’s status as a vibrant, growing metro, a closer review of the underlying dynamics – such as economic factors and demographics – is essential to providing a Community Benefit program relevant to current needs, and with the foresight to accommodate future needs.

As the city’s ever-changing population places further demands on the traditional health care system, implementing innovative and effective solutions to maintain the health and wellbeing of the community, particularly for children, remains crucial.

For more information on the status of health in Houston, please refer to The University of Texas School of Public Health’s Health of Houston Survey 2010.