Skip to main content

COVID-19 Updates: Get the latest on vaccine information, in-person appointments, video visits and more. Learn More >>

Location

Texas Medical Center

Specialty
Anesthesiology
Phone: 832-824-5800

Address

6621 Fannin Street
Suite A3300
Houston, TX 77030

Ammar Yamani, MD

Anesthesiologist

Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Baylor College of Medicine

Education

School Education Degree Year
Yale School of Medicine/Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital Fellowship Pediatric Anesthesiology 2014
Tufts University School of Medicine/Baystate Medical Center Residency Anesthesiology 2013
University of Texas School of Medicine at San Antonio Internship Surgery 2010
The University of Texas Medical Branch Medical School Doctor of Medicine 2009

About

It is a privilege to provide peri-operative medical consultation and anesthetics for pediatric patients undergoing a wide array of diagnostic, interventional, and surgical procedures.  My clinical and research interests are in regional anesthesia and multi-modal analgesic regimens as they pertain to the quality of a child's recovery, persistent post surgical pain, and neurodevelopment.  My mission is to align my clinical and research interests as closely as possible, so that they may benefit patients in both the immediate and distant future.

Organizations

Organization Name Role
American Society of Anesthesiologists Member
Society for Pediatric Anesthesia Member

Selected Publications

Feinleib, J., Kwan, LH., Yamani, A. (2016). Postoperative nausea and vomiting. In T.W. Post, N. Holt, A. Davidson, M. Crowley (Eds.), UpToDate at https://www.uptodate.com/contents/postoperative-nausea-and-vomiting?sou….

Yamani, A., D’Souza, S. Post-dural Puncture Headache in a Pediatric Patient with Pseudotumor Cerebri. ASA Conference 2012 Medically Challenging Case Session, Washington, D.C., October 2012.

Carlton, S. M., Du, J., Tan, H. Y., Nesic, O., Hargett, G. L., Bopp, A. C., Yamani, A., et al. (2009). Peripheral and central sensitization in remote spinal cord regions contribute to central neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury. Pain 147(1-3), 265-276. 

Jimenez-Andrade, J. M., Zhou, S., Yamani, A., et al. (2005). Mechanism by which peripheral galanin increases acute inflammatory pain. Brain Research 1056(2), 113-117.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19853381

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16125151 

* Texas Children's Hospital physicians' licenses and credentials are reviewed prior to practicing at any of our facilities. Sections titled From the Doctor, Professional Organizations and Publications were provided by the physician's office and were not verified by Texas Children's Hospital.