First Time Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) Shunt Survival


Percentage of Shunts Functioning at One Year After Placement
by year

2013
2014
2015
2016
71.7%
84.3%
67.3%
83.6%

First Time ETV/CPC Survival


Percentage of ETV Functioning at One Year
by year

2012-2016
39.6%

Mortality Rate
within 30 days of initial surgery

Year
Rate
2015
1.04%
2016
0.00%
2017
0.00%

Unplanned Return to the Operating Room
within 30 days of initial surgery

Procedure
Rate
Endoscopic
2.78%
Open Craniosynostosis/Craniofacial Reconstruction
0.00%
Cranioplasty/Skull Reconstruction
2.27%

Mortality Rate
within 30 days of initial surgery

Procedure
Rate
Endoscopic
0.00%
Open Craniosynostosis/Craniofacial Reconstruction
0.00%
Cranioplasty/Skull Reconstruction
0.00%

Number of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Leak After Skull Base Surgery
by year

Year
Rate
2015
0/9
2016
0/5
2017
2/9

Mortality Rate
within 30 days of initial surgery

Year
Rate
2015
0.00%
2016
0.00%
2017
0.00%

Vague Nerve Stimulation (VNS) Infection Rate
by year

Year
Rate
2015
0.00%
2016
0.00%
2017
0.00%

From January 1, 2012 through June 30, 2014

Based on transplants performed 01/01/2012-06/30/2014. Pediatric age < 18.

Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR). Program Specific Reports. Table 11 - www.srtr.org.

Per SRTR, there are too few events to calculate statistically powerful expected patient survival values for pediatric kidney and lung recipients.

From July 1, 2014 through December 31, 2016.

Based on transplants performed 07/01/2014-12/31/2016. Pediatric age < 18.

Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR). Program Specific Reports. Table 11 - www.srtr.org.

Per SRTR, there are too few events to calculate statistically powerful expected patient survivalvalues for pediatric kidney and lung recipients.

Operating room case volumes include procedures performed by Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine physicians at Texas Children’s Hospital surgical locations. Of the 32 kidney transplantations completed in 2017, 6 were living donors and 24 were deceased donors.


Year of first transplants at Texas Children’s Hospital by organ: Heart/Lung 2005; Heart 1984; Kidney 1988; Liver 1988; Lung 2002.

Hypospadias complications are reported in Fiscal Year (October to September) and over three-year rolling period. The graph above represents percentage of patient who developed complications after initial hypospadias repair and required additional surgeries within three years. The year listed denotes the initial year hypospadias repair was performed.

Number of new, return, and prenatal patients seen in our Cleft Lip and Palate Clinic every year.  Our high volume of return patient demonstrates how important the ongoing relationship between our patients and our team allows for long-term monitoring of progress, permits the identification of new concerns on a timely basis, to optimize care, ongoing assessment, and treatment.

Patients with a cleft palate may develop a fistula (hole) after their initial repair.  It may depend on the type of repair and will require additional surgeries to close the fistula. Our goals for a successful cleft palate repair includes avoidance of cleft palate fistulas.

Our Length of Stay (LOS) is the average number of hours that our cleft lip and/or palate surgical patients spend in the hospital, from beginning of post-operative area to discharge home.


Why is it important to monitor EC wait time? 

We understand that families who bring their child to the EC are anxious and want their child to be evaluated by a healthcare provider as quickly as possible. The Door-to-Doctor data helps guide our improvement work to minimize wait times in the EC.  


What does door-to-doctor measure in the Emergency Center (EC)? 

This measure reflects the “wait time” in minutes for a patient to be seen by a physician, physician assistant, or nurse practitioner. 


What can you do as a parent or caregiver? 

Many factors, such as high patient arrivals and hospital occupancy, can affect the door-to-doctor measure.  If you are concerned about the amount of time you have been waiting, or if you feel your child’s symptoms are worsening, we encourage you to ask for an update on your child’s EC wait time.


Why is it important to monitor patients leaving the EC?

At Texas Children's we strive to make sure every patient who enters the Emergency Center (EC) is seen as quickly as possible. Our goal is that no family or caregiver will choose to leave the EC before their child is seen by a doctor.


What does “patients leaving the Emergency Center measure”? 

Patients leaving the Emergency Center (EC) without being seen is one indicator (a trend) we use to determine if patients are waiting too long in the EC. There may be other reasons why a patient/family decides to leave, for example, if the child starts to feel better. So while not a perfect measure, we use this information to look for ways to improve our health care delivery for patients being treated in the Emergency Center.


What can you do as a parent or caregiver?

Check-in with the front desk and ask to speak to a health care team member. Ask for an estimated waiting time, the availability of immediate treatment for minor injuries, or any symptoms you need to be aware of until your child sees the doctor. 

Number of hand surgeries performed per year. 

Number of patients seen in our Hand Clinic per year.

Our Length of Stay (LOS) is the average number of hours that our breast reduction surgical patients spend in the hospital, from beginning of post-operative area to discharge home.

Number of breast reduction surgeries performed per year.

Number of patients seen in our Breast Clinic for breast reduction surgery.


Why is it important to monitor EC wait time? 

We understand that families who bring their child to the EC are anxious and want their child to be evaluated by a healthcare provider as quickly as possible. The Door-to-Doctor data helps guide our improvement work to minimize wait times in the EC.  


What does door-to-doctor measure in the Emergency Center (EC)? 

This measure reflects the “wait time” in minutes for a patient to be seen by a physician, physician assistant, or nurse practitioner. 


What can you do as a parent or caregiver? 

Many factors, such as high patient arrivals and hospital occupancy, can affect the door-to-doctor measure.  If you are concerned about the amount of time you have been waiting, or if you feel your child’s symptoms are worsening, we encourage you to ask for an update on your child’s EC wait time.


Why is it important to monitor EC wait time? 

We understand that families who bring their child to the EC are anxious and want their child to be evaluated by a healthcare provider as quickly as possible. The Door-to-Doctor data helps guide our improvement work to minimize wait times in the EC.  


What does door-to-doctor measure in the Emergency Center (EC)? 

This measure reflects the “wait time” in minutes for a patient to be seen by a physician, physician assistant, or nurse practitioner. 


What can you do as a parent or caregiver? 

Many factors, such as high patient arrivals and hospital occupancy, can affect the door-to-doctor measure.  If you are concerned about the amount of time you have been waiting, or if you feel your child’s symptoms are worsening, we encourage you to ask for an update on your child’s EC wait time.


What is a transfer request?

A transfer request comes at the direction of any person employed by (or affiliated or associated, directly or indirectly) with the referring hospital, including a parent, caregiver or patient request to receive care at another hospital (receiving hospital).  It is the potential movement and transition of care of an individual from their current hospital to another hospital.


Why would a patient transfer?

Below are a few examples of why a transfer request would be initiated by the referring hospital:

  • Higher level of care
  • Specialty services
  • Parent, caregiver, or patient request

Why is it important to monitor transfer requests?

Our goal continues to be ensuring that we have the capacity to provide the very best care for each and every child who comes to Texas Children’s.


What does “transfer requests denied for capacity” measure?

Texas Children’s Hospital may deny  the request for a child to be transferred from another hospital if our system does not have capacity and/or capability to provide appropriate care for the patient.


What can you do as a parent or caregiver?  

If you question whether your child is being cared for in a facility that best meets his or her needs, we recommend that you ask questions and open the dialog with your child’s healthcare team.  Texas Children’s is an option for many referring facilities, particularly when specialty services or higher level of care is needed. Our Transfer Center assists in coordinating patient transfer requests by connecting the people that have the most impact in your child’s care.


Why is it important to monitor patients leaving the EC?

At Texas Children's we strive to make sure every patient who enters the Emergency Center (EC) is seen as quickly as possible. Our goal is that no family or caregiver will choose to leave the EC before their child is seen by a doctor.


What does “patients leaving the Emergency Center measure”? 

Patients leaving the Emergency Center (EC) without being seen is one indicator (a trend) we use to determine if patients are waiting too long in the EC. There may be other reasons why a patient/family decides to leave, for example, if the child starts to feel better. So while not a perfect measure, we use this information to look for ways to improve our health care delivery for patients being treated in the Emergency Center.


What can you do as a parent or caregiver?

Check-in with the front desk and ask to speak to a health care team member. Ask for an estimated waiting time, the availability of immediate treatment for minor injuries, or any symptoms you need to be aware of until your child sees the doctor. 


Why is it important to monitor patients leaving the EC?

At Texas Children's we strive to make sure every patient who enters the Emergency Center (EC) is seen as quickly as possible. Our goal is that no family or caregiver will choose to leave the EC before their child is seen by a doctor.


What does “patients leaving the Emergency Center measure”? 

Patients leaving the Emergency Center (EC) without being seen is one indicator (a trend) we use to determine if patients are waiting too long in the EC. There may be other reasons why a patient/family decides to leave, for example, if the child starts to feel better. So while not a perfect measure, we use this information to look for ways to improve our health care delivery for patients being treated in the Emergency Center.


What can you do as a parent or caregiver?

Check-in with the front desk and ask to speak to a health care team member. Ask for an estimated waiting time, the availability of immediate treatment for minor injuries, or any symptoms you need to be aware of until your child sees the doctor. 


Why is clinic appointment availability important?

We understand the complexities of family life and the importance of getting a prompt appointment for your child at a time that is convenient for you.


What does clinic appointment availability (3rd Next Available) measure?

Clinic appointment availability measures the third next available appointment which is the Healthcare industry standard for measuring appointment access. Third Next Available is preferable to the first or second available appointment, because it best represents the performance of the appointment access as a whole. Often, the first and second available appointments occur due to cancelations or other events.


What can you do as a parent or caregiver?

If your child needs to see a new doctor or specialists, you should be able to make a new patient appointment within two weeks of your request. We encourage you to follow-up with your child’s primary care doctor if you have any trouble making a new patient appointment.

How is Patient Satisfaction different than Patient Experience?

Patient Experience is assessed based on finding out from patients/families whether something that should happen in a healthcare setting actually happened or how often it happened (e.g. clear communication with a provider).  (AHRQ, 2018)

Patient Satisfaction is assessed based on whether a patient’s/family’s expectations about a health encounter were met or not.  (AHRQ, 2018)


Why is Patient Experience important?

Texas Children’s Hospital remains committed to improving our patients’ experience by continuing to collect family feedback in a variety of ways.  By benchmarking with our past performance and the performance of other leading children’s and women’s hospitals nationwide, we are always striving to improve.


What does Patient Experience measure?

Texas Children’s Hospital is committed to providing a high-quality service to ensure a positive and healing patient and family experience.  Patient Experience measures are in place to improve how our patients and families perceive the entire spectrum of their health encounter and not just one aspect of it.


What can YOU do as a parent or caregiver?  

Texas Children’s Hospital highly values feedback from patients and families.  All improvement efforts are directly related to the feedback received through our patient satisfaction surveys, which are administered anonymously by a third party company – Press Ganey Inc.


What is a surgical site infection?

Most patients at Texas Children's Hospital who have surgery do well, but sometimes patients develop surgical wound infections at the site of the surgery. We have safe processes in place that reduce the risk of infection. Our goal is for no child to encounter a surgical site infection.


What does surgical site infection (SSI) measure?

The number of surgical cases per 100 trips to the operating room where a patient developed an infection following surgery.


What can you do as a parent or caregiver?

Make sure your everyone, including members of the healthcare team, has clean hands before examining your child’s surgical site. We encourage you to speak up if you notice someone has not washed their hands. Do not let family and friends touch the surgical wound or dressing. Notify the healthcare team immediately of any symptoms of an infection, such as redness or pain at the surgery site, drainage or fever – or any concerns you have about your child’s surgical site.

Learn More


What is a central line associated blood stream infection (CLABSI)?

A central line or central catheter is a small plastic tube placed into a larger blood vessel. This catheter is used to deliver fluids and medications, and to draw blood for tests. A central line associate blood stream infection can happen if bacteria or other germs enter the bloodstream through the catheter. These infections are serious, but can often be successfully treated with medicine. Texas Children's Hospital is continuously working to reduce the occurrence of central line infections. Our measures reflect the overall rate of the Central Line Associated BSI in our intensive care units.


What does central line associated blood stream infection (BSI) measure? 

The number of related infections per 1,000 catheter line days.  Each day a patient has a central line catheter in place counts as one catheter day.


What can you do as a parent or caregiver?

Here are some helpful tips to help prevent central line associated blood stream infections:

  • Everyone visiting the patient must wash their hands before and after they visit.
  • Pay attention to the bandage and area around the central line catheter. If the bandage or tape comes off or if the area around it is wet or dirty, tell a member of your child’s healthcare team right away.
  • On a regular basis ask the healthcare team if the central line is absolutely necessary. If so, ask them to help you understand the need for it and how long it will be in place.
  • Do not get the central line wet.
  • Notify the healthcare team immediately if the area around the catheter is sore or red or if your child has a fever or chills, or if you have any concerns.

Learn More


Why is hand hygiene important?

Preventing the spread of infection is a critical aspect of patient safety. The single most important and effective safety measure at Texas Children's Hospital is to make sure our hands are clean before and after any and every patient encounter.


What is hand hygiene compliance?

Hand hygiene compliance shows the percent of time that healthcare workers wash their hands.


What can you do as a parent or caregiver?

Don’t hesitate to ask people to wash their hands before coming in contact with your child, including doctors, nurses or other healthcare workers. The World Health Organization now recommends five distinct moments during patient care when hands should be washed. You are your child’s best advocate. We encourage you to speak up. 


The Department of Surgery at Texas Children’s Hospital is comprised of pediatric surgeons across nine surgical divisions: Congenital Heart Surgery, Dental, Neurosurgery, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, Otolaryngology, Pediatric Surgery, Plastic Surgery and Urology. In conjunction with our partners in Anesthesiology, Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology and Transplant Services, we have more than 120 surgeons, 135 advanced practice providers and 950 employees dedicated to ensuring children get the surgical care they need.

Our team’s robust activities are reflected in the more than 33,100 operating room cases and over 228,400 clinic visits completed in 2018, the substantial external research funding obtained by our faculty, and the many prestigious scholarly articles published and presentations given nationally and internationally by our team each year.

Operating room suites managed across the Texas Children’s system include:

  • 25 at the Texas Children’s Texas Medical Center location
  • 6 at Texas Children’s Pavilion for Women
  • 6 at Texas Children’s Hospital West Campus
  • 4 at Texas Children’s Hospital The Woodlands

Most of the surgical suites are integrated with video, endoscopic, robotic or microscopic equipment. For specialized surgical interventions such as fetal, heart and transplant surgery, we offer highly customized equipment and operating rooms as well as specially trained support staff. When children are too sick to be moved to an operating or procedure room, a mobile team, which includes a fellowship-trained pediatric anesthesiologist, travels throughout the hospital to perform bedside procedures.

Our Department of Surgery Annual Report, which includes important data about our patient volumes and outcomes, is available below:

Operating room case volume includes procedures performed by Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine and private practice physicians at Texas Children's Hospital surgical locations.

Operating room case volumes include procedures performed by Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine and private practice physicians at Texas Children's Hospital surgical locations.

Clinic visits include outpatient visits by Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine faculty only.

Operating room case volumes include procedures performed by Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine and private practice physicians at Texas Children's Hospital surgical locations.

Clinic visits include outpatient visits by Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine faculty only.

Operating room case volumes include procedures performed by Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine and private practice physicians at Texas Children's Hospital surgical locations.

Clinic visits include outpatient visits by Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine faculty only.

Clinic visits include patient visits by Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine faculty only.

Operating room case volumes include procedures performed by Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine and private practice physicians at Texas Children's Hospital surgical locations.

Operating room case volumes include procedures performed by Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine and private practice physicians at Texas Children's Hospital surgical locations.

Clinic visits include outpatient visits by Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine faculty only.

Clinic visits include outpatient visits by Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine faculty only.

Operating room case volumes include procedures performed by Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine and private practice physicians at Texas Children's Hospital surgical locations.

Operating room cases and clinic visits include procedures and outpatient visits completed by physicians at Texas Children's Hospital surgical locations.

Operating room case volumes included procedures performed by Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine and private practice physicians at Texas Children's Hospital surgical locations. Clinic visits include outpatient visits by Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine faculty only.

Operating room cases are defined as cases when operating room staff and supplies are used. Cases with multiple procedures count as one case and are attributed to the service line of the primary surgeon. Operating room case volumes include procedures performed by Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine and private practice physicians at Texas Children's Hospital locations. Clinic visits include outpatient visits by Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine faculty only.

Supraventricular tachycardia ablation outcomes

2018 Acute Success Rate

99.2%

National Benchmark*

95.2%

*Based on data from the Pediatric Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation Registry.

Outcomes of patients with Anomalous Aortic Origin of a Coronary Artery (AAOCA)

Total patients seen since December 2012

134

Surgery treatment

43

Mortality

0

Complications

3

* Data is from December 2012 - March 2016

Heart Transplant Graft Survival Rates: Pediatric age <18

One Year after Transplant6,7
Texas Children’s Heart Center (N=61)
93%
SRTR expected
93.7%
Three Years after Transplant6,8
Texas Children’s Heart Center (N=56)
89.3%
SRTR expected
87.8%

6Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR). Program Specific Reports. Table 11 – srtr.org.
7Based on transplants performed from July 1, 2015 through December 31, 2017.
8Based on transplants performed from January 1, 2013 through June 30, 2015.

Mortalities by STAT classification in 2018

Primary Procedure

Number of Procedures

Number of Discharge Mortalities

% Mortality

STS National Benchmark*

STAT 1

183

0

0.00%

0.40%

STAT 2

197

2

1.00%

1.30%

STAT 3

83

0

0.00%

2.10%

STAT 4

157

4

2.60%

6.20%

STAT 5

33

3

9.10%

11.90%

Grand Total

653

9

1.40%

2.70%

STAT Classification (The Society of Thoracic Surgeons - European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery Congenital Heart Surgery Mortality Categories - (STS Mortality Categories)) is the risk stratification model applied to outcomes in congenital heart surgery. The most common surgeries are stratified into 5 categories. Surgeries with higher risk are in higher categories with STAT Category 5 representing congenital heart surgeries associated with the greatest risk.

* Source for STS National Benchmark is Table 1 of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Data Harvest Report Jan. 2017 to Dec. 2017.

Mortalities by age and operation type in 2018

Age

CPB Cases

Non-CPB Cases

CPB discharge mortalities

Non-CPB discharge mortalities

Discharge mortality

% Mortality

STS National Benchmark*

Neonate (0-30 day)

84

28

4

2

6/112

5.4%

7.4%

Infant (31 days to 1 year)

185

31

1

1

2/216

0.9%

2.6%

Child (>1 year to <18 years)

264

27

0

1

1/291

0.3%

1.1%

Adult (18 years and older)

32

2

0

0

0/34

0.0%

1.3%

Grand Total

565

88

5

4

9/653

1.4%

2.7%

Age-appropriate surgical planning and management allows for outcomes in patients of all ages to be better than the national benchmarks. Patient grand total combines CPB and non-CPB cases.

* Source for STS National Benchmark is Table 7 of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Data Harvest Report Jan. 2017 to Dec. 2017.

Overall Hospital Mortality Discharge Rate*: 0%
STS National Benchmark**: <1%

* Hospital mortality is calculated over the last four years from 2015-2018.
​** Source for STS national benchmark is the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Data Harvest Report January 2014 to December 2017.

Overall Hospital Mortality Discharge Rate*: 0%
STS National Benchmark**: 1.9%

* Hospital mortality is calculated over the last four years from 2015-2018.
​** Source for STS national benchmark is the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Data Harvest Report January 2014 to December 2017.

Overall Hospital Mortality Discharge Rate*: 0%
STS National Benchmark**: <1%

* Hospital mortality is calculated over the last four years from 2015-2018.
​** Source for STS national benchmark is the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Data Harvest Report January 2014 to December 2017.

Overall Hospital Mortality Discharge Rate*: 0.8%
STS National Benchmark**: 1.8%

* Hospital mortality is calculated over the last four years from 2015-2018
​** Source for STS national benchmark is the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Data Harvest Report January 2014 to December 2017.

Overall Hospital Mortality Discharge Rate*: 0%
STS National Benchmark**: 4.2%

* Hospital mortality is calculated over the last four years from 2015-2018.
​** Source for STS national benchmark is the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Data Harvest Report January 2014 to December 2017.

Overall Hospital Mortality Discharge Rate*: 8.8%
STS National Benchmark**: 13.9%

* Hospital mortality is calculated over the last four years from 2015-2018.
​** Source for STS national benchmark is the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Data Harvest Report January 2014 to December 2017.