Podcasts

 


Texas Children’s Hospital: Outcomes

Texas Children’s Hospital, located in Houston, Texas, is one of the nation's largest children's hospitals, with over 3.7 million patient encounters each year. With more than six decades of experience caring for some of the rarest and most complex cases, we work together to surround patients with expertise and provide the best possible outcomes for every child. Every day incredible stories occur inside our walls, here are a few of those such stories.

Season 2

Shauntelle’s story

When Shauntelle Tynan was 16 years old, she was diagnosed with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH), a rare form of cancer not well known in her native Ireland. Soon after diagnosis, Shauntelle realized Dr. Ken McClain and Texas Children’s Cancer Center were her best chance at survival. After grueling rounds of treatment in Houston, scans showed no signs of disease and she was able to ring the end of treatment bell in victory. Shauntelle is now 20 years old and back home with her friends and family in Ireland. Visit the Texas Children’s Cancer Center for more information.

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Kami's story

At 15-years-old, Kami Wooten noticed swelling in her gums and soon learned it was a rare tumor. The tumor, the size of a golf ball, was located inside her cheek and required treatment by the multidisciplinary team of Texas Children’s Head and Neck Tumor Program – a partnership between Otolaryngology and Plastic Surgery, in conjunction with the guidance of colleagues from MD Anderson Head & Neck Surgery and Baylor College of Medicine Head & Neck Surgery. In a series of lengthy procedures, surgeons removed the tumor, reconstructing Kami’s cheek with plates, screws and tissue from her leg. There are more surgeries planned as well to continue to reconstruct Kami’s jaw, providing space for dental implants and more. Through Kami’s journey she built a strong bond with her care team, and plans to study medicine to one day become a surgeon herself. Visit the Head and Neck Tumor program for more information.

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Conrad's story

After experiencing migraines for several weeks, Conrad visited multiple doctors to determine what could be the cause of his headaches. He underwent a CAT scan and physicians discovered a large brain tumor – a pilocytic astrocytoma. He would need surgery immediately to remove it. Conrad’s parents chose Texas Children’s Hospital for their son’s care and the surgery was a great success. Now in high school, Conrad has returned to his daily activities and has a bright future ahead of him. Visit the Texas Children's Neuroscience Center for more information.

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Luke's story

Expecting parents Kate and Josh Vela were devastated when they discovered at their 20 week ultrasound that their son was diagnosed in-utero with lower urinary tract obstruction, or LUTO. Listen to learn more about their journey at Texas Children’s Fetal Center and how the Fetal Team saved their son’s life with fetal surgery. For more information about LUTO and the care Texas Children’s Fetal Center provides, learn more.

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The Rise of the Anti-Vaccination Movement

Through March of 2019, the CDC has reported 6 outbreaks, over 250 cases of measles... a disease that was considered eradicated in the United States in the year 2000. But it's not just measles. The anti-vaccine movement has been spreading for years. An alarming number of children and teens are not being vaccinated for potentially deadly diseases... putting them, and others, at risk. The Immunization Project at Texas Children's Hospital and the Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development help examine the truth about vaccines and the rise of the anti-vaccination movement.

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Rusty's story

Rusty was born with two congenital heart defects, transposition of the great arteries and a ventricular septal defect, and has received care at Texas Children's Hospital for most of his life. As an adult, he now receives care from specialists in the Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ACHD) Program, which enables patients with congenital heart disease to receive seamless continuation of care from birth throughout adulthood. As pediatric patients with congenital heart defects transition into adulthood, our multidisciplinary team of experienced congenital heart disease specialists advises patients on health and lifestyle choices for their adult needs, including physical challenges, exercise options and family planning.

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Blake's story

Blake faced a life-changing event while simply doing what he enjoyed the most. During a routine track meet while doing a triple jump, something went wrong. He flew sideways and knew his landing was off. He tried walking out of the pit, but his right leg completely collapsed under him. From that point on, he knew he had broken his leg. The Sports Medicine and Sports Physical Therapy team at Texas Children's Hospital worked together on a plan to get Blake back to his full ability before the upcoming track season. Visit Texas Children's Sports Medicine Department for more information.

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Season 1

Aiden's story

Jenny Rodgers went to a regular OB/GYN visit for her 20-week ultrasound, expecting everything to be normal. Instead, the news she received was earth-shattering. Her baby had only half his heart – a rare and life-threatening condition called hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Jenny and her husband Philip chose Texas Children’s Hospital to ensure the best possible care for their son. Aiden Rodgers was born at Texas Children’s Pavilion for Women and just four days later, he had his first open-heart surgery to begin repairing his half-formed heart and get him home. Visit the Texas Children's Heart Center for more information.

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Eden's story

In June of 2015, when Eden Green was just 10 years old, she was diagnosed with a rare tumor that had spread throughout her body, including her leg, shoulder and hip cavity. Soon after diagnosis, Eden’s treatment plan was drafted by the Rare Tumors and Neuroblastoma Programs at Texas Children’s Cancer Center – which included many rounds of chemotherapy and hip surgery. Several months later, scans showed no signs of disease and Eden was officially declared cancer-free. Visit the Texas Children's Cancer Center for more information.

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Luke's story

At 3 weeks old, Luke was diagnosed with tuberous sclerosis, a rare disease that causes benign tumors to grow on the brain and other vital organs. As a result of his disease, he experienced frequent seizures that affected his development and safety. Luke was referred to Texas Children’s Neuroscience Center for laser ablation surgery. Pioneered at Texas Children’s, this minimally-invasive surgery uses real-time MRI-guided thermal imaging and laser technology to destroy the lesions in the brain that cause epilepsy and uncontrollable seizures. The surgery was a tremendous success and Luke is now seizure-free. Visit the Texas Children's Neuroscience Center for more information.

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Lydia's story

Like so many expecting parents, Amy and Joe Krese went into their 20-week ultrasound with a mix of excitement and apprehension. They were overjoyed to find they were having a girl but also learned their daughter had a bilateral congenital diaphragmatic hernia, or bilateral CDH. An MRI showed her diaphragm had two holes so her stomach and liver were both high in the chest, and her lungs were compressed into two tiny slivers. The Kreses expected the worst and prepared for their little Lydia to live for only moments after birth. But the clinical care team at Texas Children’s Fetal Center® gave them hope with the innovative fetal surgery called fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion, or FETO. Listen to learn more about their journey at Texas Children’s Fetal Center and how the Fetal Team saved their daughter’s life with this innovative fetal surgery. Visit Texas Children's Fetal Center for more information and the full continuum of care we provide.

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Madison's story

Madison was born with a complex lymphatic anomaly known as CLOVES Syndrome, in which there are only about 150 cases documented worldwide. As a result, her lymphatic system was not built properly, so she has pools of fluid and cysts in her upper body. However, thanks to Dr. Ionela Iacobas and the multi-disciplinary Vascular Anomalies Clinic, Madison is thriving and meeting milestones originally not thought to be possible. Visit the Vascular Anomalies Center for more information.

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Vaccine-Preventable Disease: HPV

Vaccines are one of the most significant public health achievements of all time. In 2006, we were dealt a game-changer. A vaccine became available that allows parents to protect their children against a disease that causes more than half a dozen different types of cancers including cervical, head, neck, anal, penile, vaginal and vulvar. This disease – human papillomavirus, or HPV – currently affects 79 million Americans and causes 27,000 new cases of cancer in the U.S. each year. Suddenly, we became the generation that could reduce or end HPV-related cancers. And yet, sadly, many parents are declining this life-changing vaccine. Visit the Immunization Project at Texas Children’s Hospital for more information.

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Built Just For Kids

On February 1, 1954 Texas Children’s Hospital was founded. That first year, 4,558 patients were treated. And the mission began to heal sick children. Texas Children’s became the first hospital in Houston dedicated solely to pediatric patients. Today, Texas Children’s Hospital takes care of millions of kids each year. From the waiting rooms to special medical devices – everything and everyone is dedicated to their care.

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